Bird Migration

classic Classic list List threaded Threaded
4 messages Options
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Bird Migration

welcomekoa
Im not sure if i'm reading into too much but...
for the past two months I've been hearing birdcalls/chirping that I've never heard before in my area. I've been living here for 5 years now, and I'm noticing that either new species might be in the area, or for some reason the birds are just chirping a bit differently. I'm not a major bird enthusiast and I usually just ignore them, but being a lover of music/sounds, I definitely notice that I've been hearing two new and different bird calls. For a while I just thought I was crazy, but now I'm wondering if others have had the same experience and if EMFs might be the cause for throwing them off course. I have no idea about which resources I could use to confirm this so I thought I'd share it here. I'm stumped.
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Bird Migration

Merializer
Could be because of climate change.
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Bird Migration

Dandelion
In reply to this post by welcomekoa
I'm a birder and if I knew what species it was and what the call sounds like I might be able to tell. I know EMFs affect birds (for a heartwarming feel-good video look up the one about the cockatoos ripping up the 5G tower). When I used to look for wildlife biology jobs, I noticed that there were many jobs available counting dead birds at the base of cell towers. Luckily I never took one of those (I did once have a job that included chasing California condors off cell towers).
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Bird Migration

chupa38
In reply to this post by welcomekoa
Life long birder here. I like to see "rare" birds. Many things can throw migrating birds off course. The most common is weather patterns. One of the best years anyone can have in seeing the most birds in their country is an el nino event. These events lead to very good big years. A big year is a type of sporting event in which birders try to out do other birders by seeing the most birds one can in their country (usually but there are world wide big years) in one year. The movie "the big year" based on the book with Steve martin and Jack black is a hilarious introduction into this strange world. Could it be that the birds are not rare at all and that your just noticing them more because you have more free time? I mean there are over 1000 species in the U.S. alone. In my town on a good day you can see 100 of the more then 400 found in the state if you try hard however if your casual you could easily encounter 30 different birds. One thing that happens here that can cause an influx of migrants is something called a fall out. Its were the winds that they use to fly north (or south) changed suddenly and cause them to sort of take a pause if you will. They will regroup, rest, feed, etc before moving on when the winds are more favorable. In fact in my area if there are strong "southerly winds" its time to head to the local migrant trap but overall its time to start looking for migrants as it will definitely be more interesting. One thing that does happen is that birds get so far from their home turf that it really raises the question of how did this happen. One of the biggest theories is that something happens to their internal compass which they thing is driven by the earths magnetism. Were talking crazy strays or vagrants. Like a bird normally found in Jolly ole England ending up in the middle of A field in Midwest U.S. I think emfs might explain why some of these birds get so utterly lost but there are just as many more reasons they wind up so far from their normal range.